New Doctor – Same Practice

One of the training videos in our training library is entitled, “When and Why Technicians Don’t Offer Options”. We all know there are certain times when techs feel that a repeat customer has already had a lot of options offered by previous techs in the company and the customer has opted to not go with these options. The common knee jerk response is, “They don’t want anything, so why should I do my whole process?”

That’s a fair question from technicians and the only answer is to do the process every single time regardless of situation. I train a specific process in our three day schools and I help the technicians realize that the process will set them free, not put them in a box.

Nobody wants to be put in a process box and walk around like a scripted robot all day every day. I completely get that and I wouldn’t want that for myself, nor will I train a technician to become a robot. However, understanding that a good scripted process (to a point) will completely set technicians free to worry about other things they seem worry about on calls.

They have to think about safety, technical issues, customer service, options, etc. There is a lot going on for a technician at the time they arrive at the door of a service call, so our process should focus on setting them up for success as much as humanly possible!

Success begins with two-way connection through communication.

The lovely Christy and I just returned from an awesome vacation in the Mayan Riviera of Mexico. During this amazing time together, we spent one epic day bodysurfing and playing full out in the ocean. Somehow I managed to get tossed around by the waves and current, slammed into the ocean floor enough to get very bumped and bruised, but the highlight result is a bulged disc pinching a nerve in my neck which turned into a bit of a major challenge for me.

The day we returned and I got into my local doctor was a day he was out sick, so I saw his partner for my pain. This was the first experience I had with his partner, so I was interested to see how the service would be. I’ve been with my personal family doctor for over 20 years, so I have a certain expectation and I really, really like “my guy”. This is no different than our own customers at times when it comes to having a favorite technician.

The “new” doctor came into the room and began to ask me questions. Strangely enough, he didn’t begin with questions regarding the issues around my neck or injury (technical questions), but rather he began asking how long I had been seeing my doctor, where I was from originally, what I do for work, etc. He then opened up a little about himself, where he came from, went to medical school, how he landed here in Grand Junction, etc.

Then and only then, once we had developed some rapport, did he begin to move into the neck issues and what was causing them. This was amazing! I was at a doctor’s office…you know, that place that we usually get some of the worst service on the planet!!! Here I am having a proven system (that I teach) used on me to gain trust with my service provider.

This is exactly what we need our techs focused on. Build rapport first by asking questions and sharing a little about themselves to establish some early trust and credibility, and then move into technical issues at hand.

Kenny