The Objection Your Customer Will Never Admit To – And How to Overcome It!

I was doing a virtual training session this week with a client in Indiana when we began discussing the built-in objections that technicians face on almost every service call. There are things that are not going in our favor from the time we answer the phone to well beyond once the technician arrives at the home.

One of best ways to grow your company and average sales tickets is to acknowledge anything that is not in our favor and avoid “the elephant in the living room.” Customers will never ask a company team member all the questions they have. They don’t want to look dumb at any level and their egos usually block them from telling you if they don’t understand what you’re trying to educate them about.
Due to this fact, we need to address a simple but much overlooked objection that most technicians slide right by and take for granted instead of improving the value proposition in the process. The objection I’m referring to is the fact that we are a complete and total interruption to our customers every single day. Sure we have systems in place to stay in great communication with them, schedule service times that are the most convenient for them whenever possible, and give them windows of service with a call before we head toward their home.

These are all great measures and very necessary, but even given all of us doing the best we can do, we are still disrupting our customers’ normal schedules for the day. This can show up in a variety of ways. Some people have to take time off work. Some people have to change plans and make special arrangements to meet a technician. Some people stay at home and aren’t interrupted by work, but they still don’t have control over their schedule for that day.

There is the key statement I want you to zone in on. The customer does not have control of their day when they are waiting for service.

We can’t change this fact, but we can build a big difference between how we handle this fact of life and built in objection compared to the way most companies handle this. We don’t need to go crazy here, but we need to acknowledge the simple fact that they are inconvenienced by displaying genuine empathy no matter how trivial it may seem to us.

I’ve owned my service company for over twenty years now, and I’m continuously being reminded how important this step of the service call is. We live in a society that is built on instant gratification. Imagine if you had to use a dial-up internet connection in today’s world? You’d go crazy in the first five minutes. Nowadays if an iPhone doesn’t find the website desired quick enough (within seconds), most people are ready to throw it out the window and go get the latest version.

This challenge can be a huge opportunity for those of us in the service business. People are busy. They are conditioned to having the things they want, when they want, and the exact way that they want. When we train our front line team to understand this simple law, we connect with customers at a whole new level. As we know, any time we have a great connection with a customer, good things happen.

Show your customers you care about their time. Demonstrate to them that you have complete compassion for their unfortunate situation, even if you’ve seen this particular repair over a thousand times and you can fix it in your sleep. Even though the simple act of caring, showing gratitude, and empathy doesn’t cost a dime, I don’t see it demonstrated enough in the field. Ramp up your team’s effective communication skills and watch your results improve.

My very best,
Kenny